Educational Resources

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Introduction to Breast Cancer

Government of Canada. Breast cancer and your risk.

Breast cancer and your risk brochure identify risk factors associated with breast cancer. It gives information on risk factors, lifestyle risk factors and screening.
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HealthLink BC - Breast Cancer

This website introduces specific information about breast cancer, related screening, and other sites. It outlines breast cancer, what causes it, and the signs and symptoms. The site then provides health tools and explains how breast cancer is diagnosed, treated, and prevented.
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Breast Health

This webpage provides five ways to reduce the risk for breast cancer.
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National Cancer Institute – Breast Cancer

According to the site, breast cancer is the second most common cancer in women. Discover the connections on this page to learn more about prevention, screening, treatment, research and clinical trials on breast cancer.
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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention – What is Breast Cancer

This website provides an overview of breast cancer. It explains what breast cancer is and overviews different types of breast cancer. The dropdown menu can guide further research with information on symptoms, risk factors, risks, screening, dense breasts, diagnosis, and treatments. The website includes visuals and diagrams to illustrate breast cancer and better share related resources.
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Canadian Cancer Society

This page talks about breast cancer, treatments, living with cancer, and associated resources.
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Breast cancer. (n.d.). BC Cancer.

Finding information about one breast cancer can be a complex process considering how much information there is and the amount of time it takes. BC Cancer provides an easy-to-read and easy-to-navigate website. This website provides a one-stop for cancer patients to receive all the information they need, such as risk factors, breast cancer myths, screening, treatment, etc.
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Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care.

Recommendations on screening for breast cancer in women 40-74 years of age who are not at increased risk.
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Cancer Treatment - Related Side Effects

Chemotherapy and care

Recognition and management oftreatment-related side effects in breast cancer.

John Hopkins Medicine – Side Effects from Breast Cancer Treatment
This site defines the difference between long-term and late side effects and describes the impact of these side effects on health. Two videos are included. The first explores the impact of breast cancer treatment on long-term health. The second examines the late effects of breast cancer treatment.
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Side effects of chemotherapy in cancer

BreastCancer.Org – Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects
This page by BreastCancer.Org explains what chemotherapy is, how it works in cancer treatment, and possible side effects. The side effects mentioned are hyperlinked to pages with additional information such as specific treatments that can cause the side effect and how they can be managed.
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The website BreastCancer.Org provides education on common breast cancer medications. The information provided includes avoiding medicines while taking the drug, reasons for taking medicine, side effects, and more. Some examples of drugs:
Tamoxifen
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Letrozole (Femara)
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Anastrozole
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Adriamycin
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Aromasin
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Herceptin
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Chemotherapy for breast cancer. (n.d.). American Cancer Society. Information and Resources about Cancer: Breast, Colon, Lung, Prostate, Skin.

Chemotherapy is used as an anti-cancer drug that may be given intravenously (injected into your vein) or by mouth. The drug enters the bloodstream and travels through the body to the cancerous parts of the body. In most cases, chemotherapy can cause many side effects with that in mind. The American Cancer Society provides chemotherapy and its associated side effects in easy-to-read list format. This site describes what chemotherapy is and explores when it is used in breast cancer. It then explains which chemotherapy drugs are most often used for breast cancer and how chemotherapy is given.
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Canadian Cancer Society – Side Effects of Chemotherapy

This website explains what chemotherapy is and explores common side effects of chemotherapy. The side effects explored include low blood cell counts, fatigue, nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite, hair loss, diarrhea, constipation, sore mouth, inflamed mucous membranes, changes in taste and smell, skin changes, eye changes, pain, pain at the injection site, inflamed vein, hearing problems, organ damage, thinking and memory changes, sexual and fertility problems, and second cancers.
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Drug-induced lupus

This website outlines what lupus is and how it can be caused by specific prescription medication. Links are provided to additional information, such as which drugs most commonly cause drug-induced lupus.
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Chemotherapy aftercare in breast cancer

After treatment is over. (n.d.). Home.
Cancer Care Manitoba provides an interactive video about living one’s life after treatment is over. Furthermore, it discusses how breast cancer patients and cancer patients, in general, can move forward after cancer treatment in an easy-to-read and apply list format with specific cancer information booklets attached to the site.
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Care About Mastectomy After Breast Cancer

BreastCancer.Org – Mastectomy: What to Expect

This website explores what to expect with a mastectomy. The information is divided into before, during, and after mastectomy surgery. The recovery section at home guides is taking pain medication, caring for your dressings, caring for drains, and more. The website discusses short-term mastectomy management and long-term considerations following a mastectomy.
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Sunnybrook Health Science Centre – After Surgery Care

This website outlines how to care for yourself after surgery. It provides some insight into how you may feel following surgery. Following this, it outlines things you will need to do after surgery. This includes deep breathing and coughing, movement, bandages, pain, medicines, and constipation.
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Skin wounds after mastectomy in breast cancer treatment

Alberta Health – Mastectomy: What to Expect at Home

This website looks at recovering from a mastectomy. The website outline a general timeline of recovery and goals in detail, such as physical symptoms you may experience and how your routine may need to differ during your recovery. It explains how you can care for yourself at home by outlining activity, diet, medicines, incision care, drain care, and arm exercises. Lastly, the website explains what signs and symptoms indicate that you should seek additional support from your health care team.
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Alberta Health – Mastectomy: What to Expect at Home

This website looks at recovering from a mastectomy. The website outline a general timeline of recovery and goals in detail, such as physical symptoms you may experience and how your routine may need to differ during your recovery. It explains how you can care for yourself at home by outlining activity, diet, medicines, incision care, drain care, and arm exercises. Lastly, the website explains what signs and symptoms indicate that you should seek additional support from your health care team.
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Westmead Breast Cancer Institute – Wound Care

This website explains how to care for your wounds following a mastectomy. First, it explores what to expect from your wound in terms of size and site of the incision(s). After surgery, the website then explores dressings, skincare, drainage, exercise, and joint problems. The problems they explore include pain, bruising, wound swelling, drain leak and drain blockage, seroma, altered sensation and numbness, and stitches. The website then outlines and explains more serious problems following surgery that require prompt assistance from your health care team. These include wound infection, wound breakdown, and hematoma.
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Breast Health Institute – Houston – Post Mastectomy Wound Drainage Instructions

A significant portion of wound care following mastectomy involves caring for drains. This website provides instructions for wound draining following a mastectomy. The website explains why drains are necessary, outlines an estimated drain timeline, and provides criteria for drain removal. The website then outlines supplies needed to care for your drains, how to empty and record wound/drain drainage, and how to care for the drain site. The website includes many pictures and visuals to ease the process. Lastly, the website provides guidelines regarding when to contact your health team for assistance.
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Skin wounds after in breast cancer treatment

A handout on skin wounds and treatments.

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After-Effects of Radiation For Breast Cancer

Canadian Cancer Society – Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer

This website explains what radiation is and why you may need radiation to treat your breast cancer. It explores the timing of radiation therapy, radiation after breast-conserving surgery, radiation after a mastectomy, side effects of radiation, and what questions to ask your health care team about radiation.
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BreastCancer.Org – Radiation Therapy

This site explains what radiation is and what it is used for. The topics explored on this page include how radiation therapy works, types of radiation therapy, when radiation therapy is used, radiation therapy timing and breast reconstruction, radiation therapy side effects, radiation therapy for metastatic breast cancer, staying on track with radiation treatments, vitamins to avoid during radiation therapy, and radiation therapy and sun exposure.
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American Cancer Society – Radiation for Breast Cancer

This website explores radiation for breast cancer. It explains what radiation is, what situations it is needed, the main types of radiation therapy, brachytherapy, how to prepare for radiation therapy, and possible side effects.
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Taking care of your skin during radiation treatments for breast cancer

Skincare guidelines while you are receiving radiation therapy. (n.d.). Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.
Receiving radiation can have a significant essential impact on one’s skin integrity. It is necessary to know how to maintain one’s skin during chemotherapy properly. What side effects to look for and when to inform your doctor if you have such symptoms. The Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center provides all the necessary information to keep one’s skin intact and healthy.
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Care of side effects with immunotherapy in breast cancer

American Cancer Society – Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

This website outlines what immunotherapy is and how it is used in breast cancer treatment. It explains immune checkpoint inhibitors and explores some of the symptoms of immunotherapy. They include symptoms such as infusion reactions and autoimmune reactions.
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Canadian Cancer Society – Immunotherapy for Breast Cancer

This website by the Canadian Cancer Society explains the benefits of immunotherapy in breast cancer treatment. First, it defines immunotherapy and explains what it does. It then explores the side effects of immunotherapy and the importance of reporting side effects to your health care team. The website has links to additional information about specific drugs. It also provides questions to guide your discussions with your health care team.
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BreastCancer.Org – Immunotherapy

This page explains immunotherapy about the specific Immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted immunotherapy medicines used to treat breast cancer. The website then explores cancer vaccines, adoptive cell therapy, cytokines, and how you can determine if immunotherapy is right for you.
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Care of after-effects in hormonal therapy after breast cancer

BreastCancer.Org – Hormonal Therapy: What to Expect

This page explains the three different types of hormonal therapy medicines. It explains what hormonal therapy is and what it can be used for. The page then explores the factor determining which hormonal therapy medicine is right for you. Lastly, the website outline hormonal therapy timelines and how the medicines are taken.
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Canadian Cancer Society – Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

This page by the Canadian Cancer Society outlines why hormone therapy is used in breast cancer treatment. It outlines what hormone therapy is and different reasons why hormone therapy would be offered for your cancer treatment. The website explores the two most common types of hormonal therapies used to treat breast cancer anti-estrogen drugs and aromatase inhibitors. The website explores specific drugs under each category and explains how they function. Additionally, ovarian ablation and suppression are explained and discussed. The website then explores adjuvant hormonal therapy for premenopausal and postmenopausal women and the possible side effects of hormonal therapy. Lastly, the website provides questions to help guide your conversations with your health care team.
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National Cancer Institute – Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

This webpage discusses hormone therapy as a treatment for breast cancer. The website explores what hormones and hormone receptors are, what hormone therapy is, what types of hormone therapy are used for breast cancer, how hormone therapy is used to treat breast cancer, whether hormone therapy can be used to prevent breast cancer, what the side effects of hormone therapy are, and whether other drugs can interfere with hormone therapy.
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Cancer Survivorship

Breast cancer – Survivorship. (2020, August 14). Cancer.Net.

Cancer.Net is a doctor-approved site that provides cancer patients with relevant information on topics like survivorship in breast cancer. For example, it discusses survivorship, changing role of caregivers, a new perspective on your health, and survivorship resources that provide other websites and videos to expand the information and more survivorship resources.
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Questions to ask your doctor about breast cancer

Breast cancer – Questions to ask the health care team. (2020, August 14). Cancer.Net. Cancer.Net is a doctor-approved site that provides cancer patients with a listed format of the types of questions they should be asking their health care team to help them better understand their diagnosis, treatment plan, and overall care.
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Beyond breast cancer

Beyond breast cancer is a survivorship program offered for clients diagnosed with breast cancer and completed active treatment through a general surgeon. The website shows a video library of survivorship presentations that addressed vital areas such as education/information, surveillance for breast cancer recurrence or new primary cancers, assessment/management of physical/psychological long term/ late effects, health promotion – modifiable risk facts and care coordination/ navigation.
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Psychosocial & Emotional Care

Island Health – Emotional Support for Breast Cancer

This webpage offers supportive care programs through counselling services, support programs, information for emotional support and available resources.
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Canadian Cancer Society – How can we help

This site by the Canadian Cancer Society is a homepage to numerous support resources for individuals going through cancer treatment and their loved ones. Some of the resources listed include child, youth, and family supports, wig and breast prosthesis support, online community supports, connections to information specialists, supports to help find accommodation during cancer treatment, supports to help you find services in your community, assistance with smoking cessation, and assistance with transportation to and from cancer treatment. The Canadian Cancer Society aides patients diagnosed with cancer to help find support services, such as counselling.
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This page discusses living with cancer and physical rehabilitation after treatment and other services such as talking to an information specialist, finding community services, accommodation during cancer treatment, transportation to cancer treatment etc.
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Support Group for breast cancer

https://cbcn.ca. (n.d.). Support groups. Canadian Breast Cancer Network.
The Canadian Breast Cancer Network explains the importance of patients with breast cancer to have a support group. In some cases, patients have difficulty finding and creating a support group.
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Emotional well-being

https://www.cbcn.ca. (1200). Therapy. Canadian Breast Cancer Network. This webpage provides information on therapies for depression and mental health.
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BreastCancer.Org – Face-to-Face and Internet-Based Counselling Therapy Both Help Ease Fear and Anxiety in People with Cancer

This page by BreastCancer.Org overviews the fear and anxiety that occur alongside breast cancer. Although these feelings are a perfectly normal reaction, they can get in the way of living your life and focusing on your treatment. There is a multitude of benefits to counselling therapy. The webpage has more information on day-to-day matters, side effects and diagnosis.
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BC Cancer – Patient and Family Counselling

Patient and family counselling. (n.d.). BC Cancer.
BC Cancer offers support services and counselling for cancer patients and their families, caregivers and friends. Support is available in-person, by phone or in counsellor-led support groups. Counsellors specialize in cancer treatment and can help with emotions and concerns such as fear, anxiety, family and relationship problems, depression, work or school concerns, and lifestyle changes with an appointment and contacting the locations provided. The BC Cancer website helps ease finding a counsellor for cancer patients. For example, the website provides an easy-to-read website with a toll-free number to help alleviate some anxieties in finding a counsellor to support them to fit them best uniquely.
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Counselling BC

Directory of counsellors and psychologists in BC based on city, area of practice, approach and language.
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Canadian Cancer Society – Talk to an Information Specialist

The Canadian Cancer Society offers a Cancer Information Helpline. The Cancer Information Helpline is a national, toll-free service for people with cancer, caregivers, families, and significant others. They will provide information regarding cancer treatment and side effects, coping with cancer, emotional support services, prevention and complementary therapies.
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Let’s discuss

A safe place to share your experiences with cancer hosted by the Canadian Cancer Society with forums, groups and community news.
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Support for caregivers of breast cancer patients

Caregivers. (n.d.). BC Cancer.
Individuals who are the dedicated caregiver to a person going through breast cancer often get burnt out. It is essential to care for themselves and the person they are taking care of. BC Cancer provides support systems and a caregiver decision guide as an aide.
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Helping someone with cancer

Lee, S. (n.d.). How you can help someone with cancer. Canadian Cancer Society.
The Canadian Cancer Society discusses the many that can help someone going through cancer. It provides a list format with examples of how to give these caring measures. Topics covered are listening first, making sure the time is right for you to visit, not forgetting that their caregivers need help and understanding that every diagnosis is unique.
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InspireHealth Supportive Cancer Care

The Clinical Services at Inspire Health are provided by supportive care physicians, dietitians, clinical counsellors, and exercise therapists. They have experience guiding healthful diet changes, stress reduction, emotional counselling, decision-making, exercise, and personal coaching. No referral is required. Their counselling team emphasizes the importance of providing emotional and psychosocial support and evidence-based practices that can support people impacted by cancer. These practices might include talk therapy, mindfulness, art therapy, cognitive behavioural therapy, visualization, and emotional regulation.
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Connect with our online community

CancerConnection.ca is an online community.
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Wellspring Cancer Support – Breast Cancer Support Group

The Breast Cancer Support Group provides a community for female breast cancer patients to meet with one another to explore the many emotional, social and practical challenges of coping with a breast cancer diagnosis. This support group is an eight-week program intended for members who are newly diagnosed.
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BreastCancer.Org – Join our community

The BreastCancer.Org online community offers comfort and support through every aspect of diagnosis, treatment, and beyond. Their Community and Discussion Boards have registered members worldwide and many more who simply browse the stories, support, and information offered — 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
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Online peer support community

CancerConnection for online peer support community with forums, groups, resources etc.
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Support programs

Virtually available programs based on calendar.
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BC Cancer – Support Websites

On this page, you will find a thorough list of websites, information pages, and support programs compiled and evaluated by BC Cancer librarians. They have also compiled a list of websites that provide information in other languages.
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National Cancer Institute – Psychological Stress and Cancer

This site explores psychological stress related to cancer. It begins by exploring psychological stress and how the body responds to stress. It then examines the relationship between psychological stress and cancer. The website then explores how psychological stress impacts individuals affected by cancer and guidance in coping with psychological stress.
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Susan G Komen – coping with stress

This website discusses some healthy ways to help deal with this stress. First, the site explores what encompasses social supports and the benefits of having a support group. Next, the website examines counselling, mindfulness meditation, cognitive behavioural therapy, physical activity, and additional ways to cope with stress, such as expressive writing, music therapy, and stress management.
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Managing stress for breast cancer

Lee, S. (n.d.). Coping with anxiety and stress. Canadian Cancer Society.
Canadian Cancer Society provides an easy read to topics that can aid in coping with anxiety and stress. It offers possible coping aides outside of the realm of counselling and medication therapy. The site provides simple ideas such as pets, being active, laughter, and specifically mind-body physical activities.
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Coping with breast cancer emotionally. (n.d.). Breast Cancer Now.

Breast Cancer Now discusses seven key factors to consider when coping with breast cancer. For example, areas of discussion focus around; Dealing with your emotions, feeling overwhelmed, looking after your mental health, Talking to family, friends and children, Dealing with isolation, Coping with life after treatment, and finding out how others have coped. In addition to providing a helpline and personal stories from previous breast cancer patients to show others that they are not alone and might be facing the same worries and issues.
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Dealing with stress in breast cancer

Psychological stress and cancer. (n.d.). National Cancer Institute.

The National Cancer Institute carefully lays out critical psychological stress and cancer information. Breast cancer patients need to access it in an easy-to-read format. Topics covered are as listed; what is psychological stress, how does the body respond during stress, can have psychological stress cause cancer, how does psychological stress affect people who have cancer, how can people who have cancer learn to cope with psychological stress. Along with providing their resources, they used breast cancer patients to look further into the information provided.
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Managing stress for breast cancer

The website provides ideas on managing the stress toolbox.
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National Cancer Institute

Coping with breast cancer and information to help you cope with feelings, adjusting, self-image, day-to-day life, support for caregivers, cancer survivorship and questions to ask your doctor.
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University of California San Francisco – Mindfulness exercises for breast cancer

This webpage discusses mindfulness meditation for breast cancer. It begins by describing what mindfulness meditation is and how it can benefit breast cancer. The website provides some guiding instructions to guide you through simple daily practice. It provides direction about your posture, breathing and mind. Additional resources are provided for breast cancer self-care and recovery. These resources include lifestyle changes, nutrition and breast cancer, hydration and breast cancer, exercise programs, guided imagery, meditation, and sexuality and breast cancer.
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BreastCancer.Org – What is Meditation

This website explores what meditation is and how it can be beneficial in breast cancer. It discusses some common ways people meditate, expect during meditation, and tips for beginning meditation. A podcast is included on the page that explains what mindfulness and mindfulness meditation are and some myths about mindfulness. For the last 5 minutes of the podcast, the facilitator leads listeners through short, guided mindfulness meditation.
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Breast Cancer Research Foundation – Using Mindfulness to Reduce Stress and Strengthen Your Immune System

The website talks about the benefits of meditation and other mind-body interventions for breast cancer patients during the COVID-19 crisis. A video is included on the website that overviews how mindfulness can reduce stress and strengthen the immune system. Additionally, the website includes an audio file of a seven-minute stress-reducing mindfulness exercise.
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Mindfulness for breast cancer

Burdulis, G. (2017, October 10). The who, what, why of mindfulness exercises for women with advanced breast cancer (ABC). Canadian Breast Cancer Network. It provides the importance of mindfulness for breast cancer and a side explanation behind its importance; additionally, the website offers five resources to aid in mindfulness.
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Meditation

This webpage provides guided meditation and daily practices with additional resources.
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Free mindfulness project

Explore online mindfulness sessions, resources, videos, galleries, poetry and links.
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Pocket mindfulness

This website provides information on guided medication scripts.
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Stress management: doing progressive muscle relaxation

BreastCancer.Org – Progressive Muscle Relaxation
The site explains progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and how it has proven beneficial in breast cancer patients. Some of these benefits include reducing nausea, vomiting, anxiety, and depression. The site explores how PMR is completed, what to expect with PMR, and who can provide it. Lastly, the site presents some research on PMR in breast cancer and some infrequent adverse outcomes when engaging in PMR, such as physical symptoms and increased anxiety.
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Reduce Stress through Progressive Muscle Relaxation– John Hopkins Rheumatology: YouTube

The YouTube video explains Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and walks you through a brief PMR session. The session guides in relaxing and tensing numerous muscles throughout the entire body to reduce stress and anxiety.

Anxiety Canada – How to do Progressive Muscle Relaxation

The website explains the purpose of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (PMR) and how it is completed. It explores PMR’s benefits in terms of stress and anxiety management. The site provides some helpful hints and a step-by-step guide with audio recording.
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Relaxation skills are help with the effects of stress in breast cancer

Cancer relaxation techniques, Mind-body practices. (n.d.). CancerCare.
This website goes into possible techniques that can help to increase one’s mindfulness. The method is guided around breathing techniques, meditation, and guided imagery. These techniques provide the body and mind with inner peace without pharmacological approaches.
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Depression, anxiety and stress. (n.d.). Breast Cancer Network Australia.

Provides insight on Depression, anxiety and stress, where breast cancer patients can get help, and the biggest fear of breast cancer is if it will return. The site further explains the pressures in one’s life that can lead to Depression. Additionally covering how one can help relieve their anxiety, especially their fear if it will ever return.
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Kvillemo P, Bränström R. Coping with breast cancer

a meta-analysis. PLoS One. 2014 Nov 25;9(11):e112733. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0112733. PMID: 25423095; PMCID: PMC4244095.

This research paper examines the different coping types that affect a patient going through breast cancer. The paper looks at the psychological well-being and physical health of those patients. At the same time, they are coping with how both the coping factors, psychological well-being, and physical health are all linked.

Managing stress

To cope with your stress and control how you respond to stress, use coping skills such as physical/ behavioural, thinking/mental, and personal/social skills.
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Hope and Cope

Hope and Cope is a non-profit, professionally managed, volunteer-based organization that provides psychosocial support and practical resources free of charge to cancer patients, their caregivers and their families. They have a cancer survivorship program of the Jewish General Hospital’s Segal Cancer Centre, with a strong presence in its outpatient cancer clinics and inpatient units. They offer a wide variety of wellness programs at the Hope and Cope Cancer Wellness Centre, links to resources and specialized programs.
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Life Management

American Cancer Society – Managing cancer as a Chronic Illness

This website examines how cancer and cancer treatment can be a chronic illness. It explores the cycle of recurrence and remission. Moreover, it examines how to manage ongoing treatment while living everyday life with cancer. This includes learning to live with themes such as uncertainty and grief, and loss.
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Managing life with breast cancer

Breast cancer. (2021, January 27). Cancer Care Ontario.
This page offers tools and resources for patients, families and caregivers, anyone interested in breast cancer, healthcare providers. Carefully laying out prevention, screening, diagnosis, treatment, and after treatment for breast cancer. The after-treatment tab has a simple layout on essential items patients with breast cancer must consider, such as follow-up care, managing ongoing symptoms, and end-of-life care.
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Ristevska-Dimitrovska G, Filov I, Rajchanovska D, Stefanovski P, Dejanova B. Resilience and Quality of Life in Breast Cancer Patients. Open Access Maced J Med Sci. 2015 Dec 15;3(4):727-31. DOI: 10.3889/oamjms.2015.128. Epub 2015 Dec 8. PMID: 27275317; PMCID: PMC4877917.

This study discusses the relationship between quality and the patient’s resilience to breast cancer. The patient is outside life, body, and relationships directly relate to how well they are resilient to their breast cancer diagnosis. As a result, the patient’s quality of life (emotional, cognitive, social functioning, and physical) positively correlates with resilience. Thus, breast cancer patients that are more resilient usually have a better outcome.

Financial support and funding for cancer care

Canadian Cancer Society – Financial Help

There are different financial programs available that can help people with cancer and cancer survivors and their families and caregivers. The Canadian Cancer Society has compiled an extensive list of programs that you might access for financial help while you are being treated for cancer and during your recovery. Some programs are Employment insurance, sickness benefits, caregiving benefits, tax deductions, CPP and provincial programs.
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Canadian Breast Cancer Network – Facing Financial Issues

Cancer can be expensive, and the healthcare system covers not all costs. The financial burden can be heightened when a patient or a caregiver cannot work. This website by the Canadian Cancer Network outlines sources of financial support for individuals going through cancer treatment.
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Canadian Breast Cancer Network – Financial Navigator Tool

This navigation tool can help you find sources of financial aid to offset the financial liability of a cancer diagnosis. You will find programs at the national and provincial levels that either provide income support or in-kind services to help ease the impact this disease can have on your everyday life. Financial Support Resources discusses planning tips, end-of-life care planning, Health Insurance and Medicare coverage, travel, taxes and the impact a diagnosis can have on your work or school. The Financial Navigator also offers information on how to plan and prepare for the impacts of a cancer diagnosis.
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BC Cancer – Financial Assistance

This site by BC cancer provides an extensive list of supports and programs that provide financial assistance. The resources are divided into medical and non-medical costs. They include everything from Health Insurance Coverage, PharmaCare, Employer Benefits, etc., supplements such as breast prostheses, financial help, wig/head covering costs, Worksafe BC, etc., and handouts.
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Return to work for breast cancer

groupsps://www.cbcn.ca. (n.d.). Returning to work. Canadian Breast Cancer Network.
As returning to work for most patients with breast cancer, they often feel a substantial amount of stress in return. The Canadian Breast Cancer Network lays out the necessary steps to return to work without further obstacles. Such as occupational rehabilitation, talking to their doctor, and ensuring their employer obeys the employment equity act, providing suitable accommodations during the return.
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Self-Management

Self-Management BC

This website discusses the chronic care model elements to support clients with chronic health conditions with information on five As, motivational interviewing, empowerment, stages of change, health coaching, and action planning for self-management and support resources.
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Self-management in cancer care

This website provides digital cancer education with learning goals, self-management, cancer care and support programs for patients and valuable resources.
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Cancer education

Cancer Care Ontario provides patient education, guidelines and advice on self-management in the cancer toolkit, articles, programs and courses, and measurement tools, modality of care, and patient education through online modules for patients and caregivers.
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Lifestyle management for breast cancer

Hamer, J., and Warner, E. (2017). Lifestyle modifications for patients with breast cancer to improve prognosis and optimize overall health. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 189(7), E268-E274.

This article provides lifestyle changes for patients currently or previously diagnosed with breast cancer. This article offers evidence published within the last ten years using meta-analyses and systematic reviews. Various topics are covered, such as the role of lifestyle factors, particularly weight management, exercise, diet, smoking, alcohol intake and vitamin supplementation.
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Reimagining life beyond cancer

Day, J. A. (2018, April 2). Reducing the risk of breast cancer recurrence: Johns Hopkins breast center. Johns Hopkins Medicine, based in Baltimore, Maryland.
This website provides multiple videos centred around the new normal for breast cancer patients. The subjects they covered are as follows; Lifestyle Changes After Breast Cancer, Being a Survivor and Moving Beyond the Fear of Recurrence. The page talks about coping with the side effects of breast cancer treatment and reducing chances of recurrence with healthy tips.
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Exercise support in breast cancer

This page shows benefits, recommendations, questions and resources.
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Exercise support. (n.d.). BC Cancer.

The website provides relevant information regarding exercise support before and during cancer treatments. It carefully layouts out in a simple and accessible format to read, covering topics such as how much exercise is recommended and giving possible workouts that are obtainable while discussing the improvements it can provide. Such as decreased depression and improved sleep. It lays out the key benefits of maintaining an exercise routine and, at the same time, explains the best process to get started.
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Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology (CSEP)

Canadian24-hour movement guidelines, scientific statements, and movement counselling tools are shared here, focusing on physical activity, sedentary behaviours, and sleep for all ages.
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Exercise is medicine, American College of Sports Medicine

This webpage provides information on exercising with cancer, getting started, aerobic exercise programs, resistance exercise and other types of exercise.
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Nutrition-related resources for breast cancer

Dietitian Services at HealthLink BC
Nourish advice from registered dieticians and recipes from our wellness chef are included on this website. This website provides knowledge about cancer and nutrition, recipes, links, health care professionals order form etc. Some information is about fibres, boosting immunity, choosing foods, fatigue, side effects, smoothies, tips for healthy eating etc.
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Canadian Cancer Society

This page shows resources on the latest recipe for different food choices, calories, and needs. Eat well when you have cancer to get the nutrients you need while on cancer treatment.
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Cancer Navigation

Cancer navigation

Cancer patient navigation. (n.d.). Cancer Care – Provincial Cancer Care Program, Eastern Health.
Cancer patient navigators support you and your family during a cancer diagnosis. On this site, they describe their role as a cancer navigator. As well, as providing a brochure and poster with crucial information that everyone has access to.
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Patient navigator program. (2020, August 27). Alberta Cancer Foundation.

This patient navigator program covers the western part of Canada, specifically Alberta. This link coordinates care between the local centres with bigger cities for families and cancer patients to transition smoothly. They also answer and support questions or concerns and help find a navigator across the regional and community centres.
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Island Health – Breast Health Patient Navigator

The Victoria Breast Health Centre is staffed by Breast Health Patient Navigators (BHPN), Registered Nurses with expertise in breast health and breast cancer. They assist patients and their families in the early stages of the breast cancer journey. Through telephone consultation, they provide information, education and support from initial diagnosis, pre and post-surgery and in preparation for a referral.
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Indigenous Patient Navigator

Interior Health Aboriginal Patient Navigator
The Aboriginal Patient Navigators (APN) can be contacted for individuals who identify as indigenous. The APN assists Indigenous patients with access to community services that enhance continuity of care and efficient use of resources. The APN workers support Interior Health Indigenous patients, caregivers, and their families while in the healthcare system. The APN will collaborate with and assist healthcare providers in the early identification and assessment of patient needs. For both the Aboriginal patient and healthcare provider, the APN will be a resource to provide culturally sensitive health care. Spoken Language Interpreters are available through Interior Health to help communicate between staff and patients who have limited English. In most cases, the interpreter services are provided by phone, thus making this process as private as possible.
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Patient Navigator Network

HealthLink BC – Navigation Services
HealthLink BC’s health service navigators can provide you with health information, help you navigate the health care system and find health services across the province, or connect you with a registered nurse, registered dietitian, qualified exercise professional, or pharmacist. The Navigation Services team is a dynamic group of health service navigators, shift leaders, operations leads, managers and support staff.
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Canadian Breast Cancer Network

Breast cancer patient navigation is a service that helps guide cancer patients and their families through the cancer journey. The navigator works closely with you, your family doctor, the cancer team and other caregivers to help you get the best care possible. This PDF outlines navigator services for each province in Canada.
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As breast cancer progresses

Susan G Komen – Treatments for Metastatic Breast Cancer
This website explains what metastatic breast cancer is and when it can occur. The website then explains the risks of metastatic breast cancer. Although metastatic breast cancer cannot be cured, it can be treated. The website explores some treatment plans and the factors that will influence treatment, monitoring of metastatic breast cancer, hormone therapy, and drugs combined with hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and immunotherapy.
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BreastCancer.Org – Metastatic Breast Cancer

This website explains what metastatic breast cancer is and delves into the many emotions and sensations that can be experienced with a diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer. The website explores some symptoms of metastatic breast cancer based on more common diagnoses such as bone, lung, brain, and liver metastasis. Metastatic breast cancer treatment and planning are then discussed regarding surgery, chemotherapy, clinical trials and more. The website provides information about ways to live with metastatic breast cancer, including working after your diagnosis, facing fears, getting emotional support, and more.
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BreastCancer.Org – Breast Cancer Stages

This website outlines how cancer is staged and explains the importance of staging. Local, regional, and distant cancer are defined, and the TNM staging system is described. Additionally, each stage and subcategory of breast cancer is explained in detail.
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Comfort & Palliative Care

Palliative care in cancer. (n.d.). National Cancer Institute.

Palliative care in breast cancer can be a scary thing to go through as a patient, especially as a loved one caring for newly palliative. As such, the family and the patient must understand all steps necessary to take along with the required information. With that being said, the National Cancer Institute provides a list format covering various critical topics one would want to know about Palliative Care in Cancer.
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As cancer progresses

A handout on cancer progress, advanced care planning and related resources.
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Breast Cancer – When Life is Nearing its End

The website first explores the initial knowing or about your prognosis; it then explains how you can prepare for your end of life through naming a Substitute Decision Maker and Advance Care Planning. The website outlines what kind of care you will receive near the end of your life, what end of life may feel like, and lastly, what may occur after your death for your loved ones. The website provides specific information for loved ones such as general information, how to prepare, what to expect during end of life, and what happens after their loved one dies.
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National Cancer Institute – Last Days of Life

This website outlines what can be expected in your last days of life. It explores the care that takes place in the final hours and the symptoms during the final journey of life. It explains some care decisions that should occur in the final months, weeks, days, and hours of life, such as decisions around chemotherapy, immunotherapy, hospice, and a place of death. The website then outlines suffering at the end of life and palliative sedation. Lastly, grief and loss are explained with links to more information.
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American Cancer Society – Physical Changes as You Near the End of Life

This website is written specifically for a person with cancer. However, the information can be helpful for all loved ones as well. The website aims to assist in finding answers to your questions and concerns during this sensitive and challenging time. The website first explains that everyone will experience the end of life differently. It outlines some common physical changes that you will likely experience. First, the website explores fatigue and guides how fatigue can be managed. Next, pain is examined with guidance on information you should include when reporting pain so your health care team can best support you. The website then explores pain medicines and other ways to help with cancer pain. Signs that a person is in pain are provided so loved ones can identify this and help. Appetite changes are explored with information on what you can do about appetite changes. Lastly, the website explains the breathing problems that can arise near the end of life and things that can be done to ease breathing. The website highlights that every person’s situation is different and that there are steps to help manage each change in your condition. They urge you to talk to your health care team and report what you feel so that they know how they can help.
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When life is nearing its end

A handout on preparing for the end of life and information for loved ones.
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End of life care services for breast cancer

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Interdisciplinary Approaches to Psychosocial Oncology
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